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UK 'will support' neonicotinoid pesticide ban
9 November 2017 - An extended ban on controversial neonicotinoid pesticides will be supported by the UK, Environment Secretary Michael Gove says. The UK has previously resisted tighter restrictions on the pesticides, saying there was insufficient evidence. Mr Gove says that's no longer the case. 'The weight of evidence now shows the risks neonicotinoids pose to our environment, particularly to the bees and other pollinators which play such a key part in our [British Pound] 100bn food industry, is greater than previously understood,' said Mr Gove. (more)

Sheep can recognize Barack Obama's face, new study shows
8 November 2017 - A new study shows that sheep have the ability to recognize human faces from photographs on computer screens. The Cambridge University study published Wednesday [8 November] also shows that sheep can recognize the faces of their human handlers without any prior training. It had been known that sheep can recognize familiar faces of other sheep and of humans. Lead scientist Professor Jenny Morton says sheep have advanced face-recognition abilities comparable to those of humans and monkeys. (more)

Sheep recognize familiar and unfamiliar human faces from two-dimensional images
8 November 2017 - One of the most important human social skills is the ability to recognize faces. Humans recognize familiar faces easily, and can learn to identify unfamiliar faces from repeatedly presented images. Sheep are social animals that can recognize other sheep as well as familiar humans. ...Together these data show that sheep have advanced face-recognition abilities, comparable with those of humans ... (more)

The pop-up crafts shop helping war-torn communities
5 November 2017 - A small shop in England selling work from Afghanistan and elsewhere is helping people from conflict zones make a living. From a small corner window display on London's Baker Street, Edmund le Brun and Flore de Taisne are trying to help the victims of war. Their pop-up shop, Ishkar, which is also online, sells crafts from conflict zones. Among the items on display are gorgeous hand-blown glasses in green, lapis lazuli blue and turquoise, intricate kilim rugs, fine-woven camel hair shawls, earrings and necklaces, and knives. (more)

Scotland outreach to Canada yields wind energy investment
17 October 2017 - An $8.6 million investment commitment through 2019 could lead to the development of as much as 10 new wind projects for Scotland, joint venture partners said. Scotland has one of the more robust low-carbon programs in the world. The Scottish government last year ruled that natural gas derived from underground coal deposits would have no place in a greening economy. (more)

Shell to open electric vehicle charging points at UK petrol stations
17 October 2017 - Shell is opening a first wave of electric vehicle charging points at its UK petrol stations, in a sign of the far-reaching changes under way in the transport and oil sectors. Drivers will be able to recharge 80 per cent of their battery in half an hour at forecourts in London, Surrey, and Derby from this week, with a total of 10 service stations to be equipped with rapid chargers by the end of the year. There are now more than 115,000 electric cars in the UK. (more)

The UK just installed its first 'seabin' to clean plastic-polluted waters
17 October 2017 - Our oceans fill with millions of tons of plastic every single year. Portsmouth Harbor, in the UK, aims to combat this problem with the seabin, a new device that sucks plastic, oil, and other debris from the water. The seabin is, as its name suggests, a bin made up of a large fiber net and a dock-based pump. The device is aimed at collecting pollution of all sizes, down to floating debris as small as 2mm in diameter. It's even capable of collecting oil from the water, a priceless innovation in the event of an oil spill. (more)

Oxford to become first UK city to ban petrol and diesel cars from center
12 October 2017 - The university city of Oxford has unveiled plans to ban petrol and diesel cars from its center as part of the most radical set of proposals so far in Britain to curb pollution. Whilst London is rolling out an 'ultra low emission zone', which will see the most gas-guzzling vehicles pay daily charges to enter the city center from 2020, Oxford's 'Zero Emission Zone' will ban emitting vehicles from entering part of the city center from that date. (more)

Britain opens first subsidy-free solar power farm
25 September 2017 - Britain's first solar power farm to operate without a government subsidy is due to open in eastern England on Tuesday (26 September), as a sharp fall in costs has made renewable energy much more economical. Falling costs have seen solar power capacity soar in Britain to around 12 gigawatts (GW), from around 2 GW five years ago, and on one sunny day in May this year solar hit a record, providing almost 25 percent of the country's electricity. (more)

UK organic food sales on track to hit record levels
25 September 2017 - Fresh produce, dairy, and processed foods are fuelling organic sales in the UK, as they are tipped to exceed a record British Pound Sterling 2.2bn (euros 2.5bn) by the end of the year. The figures were presented at an annual trade briefing held by certifying body, The Soil Association, in London last week. According to market research company Kantar Worldpanel, the UK's organic market has grown 6.3 per cent between August 2016 and August 2017. (more)


Success of Maharishi's Programmes
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UK Parliament marks International Yoga Day - Prof Tony Nader, MD, PhD honoured with special award
16 July 2017 - The third International Yoga Day was celebrated in the House of Commons, Palace of Westminster, hosted by the All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for Indian Traditional Sciences, its Secretariat Amarjeet S Bhamra and the High Commission of India. The event on 10 July was designed to explore the value of introducing Yoga in the NHS (National Health Service). Chief Guest of the event, H.E. High Commissioner Y K Sinha paid tribute to the work of the APPG in introducing Yoga, Ayurveda and other disciplines into the mainstream of public life. Prof Tony Nader, MD, PhD, MARR, head of the worldwide Transcendental Meditation organization, was honoured with a special award, and presented five volumes of Scientific Research on the Transcendental Meditation Programme to Members of Parliament. In his keynote address Prof Nader explained that 'every one of us has within us, built into our very physiology, the essential quality of Yoga, which is unifying.' (more)

UK: Could Ayurveda be the cure for ailing National Health System?
1 July 2017 - As the UK's National Health Service (NHS) shoulders a growing financial burden, the ancient Indian tradition of Ayurveda is being promoted as a way to take the pressure off doctors while helping people keep good health. At the recent Second International Ayurveda Congress in London, Dr Rainer Picha, chairman of the International Maharishi Ayurveda Foundation in the Netherlands (one of three organizations that hosted the Congress), said: 'Modern medicine has become hugely expensive to support. Rather, we should be focused on the prevention of disease, which is much cheaper than curing diseases.' (more)

UK: SuperMind Peak Performance Programme - Transcendental Meditation for professionals
20 June 2017 - The SuperMind Peak Performance Programme, a division of the David Lynch Foundation UK, offers Transcendental Meditation to companies and organisations to help executives and employees overcome stress, promote health, and attain high levels of performance. (more)

Second International Ayurveda Congress held in London, 1-3 April
24 April 2017 - The Second International Ayurveda Congress, held in London 1-3 April, was organized by the All India Ayurvedic Congress, New Delhi, the International Academy of Ayurved, Pune and the International Maharishi AyurVeda Foundation, Netherlands. At the Congress, 300 delegates from 55 countries, including research scientists, doctors, and pharmacologists with expertise in Western and Ayurvedic medicine, discussed scientific evidence on preventing disease, promoting longevity and alleviating specific conditions with Ayurveda. The title of the Congress was: ''Ayurveda - The Pursuit of Health, Happiness and Long Life through Prevention-oriented Health Care''. (more)

Profile: Transcendental Meditation, the 'missing piece of the recovery puzzle'
12 April 2017 - Having overcome alcohol addiction through the Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) 12 step programme, an engineer in Glasgow, Scotland, found Transcendental Meditation to be the missing element in his recovery - allowing him to finally feel rested, and alleviating the high anxiety churning in his 'racing brain'. 'I would be anxious and fearful about something or someone or some event and I would do my TM practice and come out from it rested and full of energy,' he says. 'My ''great fears'' would have evaporated to the point where I had forgotten about what was giving me so much grief in the first place.' With TM, 'the energy of that anxious catastrophic ''racing brain'' is now channelled into creativity both in my personal and professional life.' (more)

UK: 'Ayurveda for Everyone' offers world class speakers and health fair - London, 1-2 April
1 April 2017 - Alongside the Second International Ayurveda Congress, taking place in London this weekend, 'Ayurveda for Everyone', a health fair and full programme of speakers, is being offered to the public. At the Health Fair, experts in Ayurveda, the timeless science of natural medicine, are sharing simple health secrets with the public, such as how to enjoy deep refreshing sleep, banish anxiety and depression, and keep the heart healthy. Exhibitors include leading Ayurvedic institutions and producers of authentic Ayurvedic products and medicines, offering expert advice, sample treatments, and information about health spas, Vedic Architecture, and meditation. (more)

UK: Second International Ayurveda Congress, 1-2 April in London - Minister of AYUSH, Government of India, researchers and scholars from many countries to attend
31 March 2017 - The Second International Ayurveda Congress is being held this weekend in London, with the theme: Ayurveda - the Pursuit of Health, Happiness and Long Life through Prevention-Oriented Health Care. The Congress has drawn more than 80 leading speakers - experts and researchers in the various fields of Ayurveda. The Minister of AYUSH of the Government of India, His Excellency, Minister Shripad Yesso Naik, will honour the Congress by attending. A special Congress extension is planned for 3 April, including sessions on Establishing Ayurveda Globally: strategy and planning with the Ministry of AYUSH and Ayurveda leaders from India and throughout the world; followed by a Global Maharishi Ayurveda Summit, chaired by Dr Tony Nader, MD, PhD, Patron of the Congress. 'Ayurveda for Everyone', a concurrent health fair and full programme of speakers, is offered for the public. (more)

Second International Ayurveda Congress to be held in London - 1-2 April 2017: 'Time-Tested, Scientifically Verified Solutions For the Health Problems of Our Time'
10 January 2017 - All India Ayurvedic Congress, New Delhi; International Academy of Ayurved, Pune; and International Maharishi AyurVeda Foundation, Netherlands, extend a warm invitation to all health professionals, Ayurvedic scholars, and researchers from India and around the world to participate at this Second International Ayurveda Congress to be held in London in April. Internationally renowned scholars will be keynote speakers at the Congress and will present scientifically verified solutions to showcase the effectiveness of Ayurveda towards fulfilling the human pursuit of health, happiness, and long life. The International Ayurveda Congress offers a prestigious platform for research scholars to present their findings in various fields of Ayurveda. The latest innovative and pioneering work will be presented in this Congress. (more)

Prince Charles' initiatives in holistic education: Parallels with Consciousness-Based Education
2 December 2016 - In Part 2 of this series, Ann Purcell explores initiatives by Prince Charles of the UK in holistic education, highlighting parallels to the system of Consciousness-Based Education founded by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. In his book Harmony: A New Way of Looking at Our World, Prince Charles describes major historical shifts in human thought over the past centuries through which 'nature was understood as being outside of us, something we could conquer and control. Education began to reflect this separation and focused on separate bits of information rather than on connections.' The prince has sought to promote 'a return to holistic education' through establishing innovative educational institutes where children can connect conventional academic subjects with universal patterns in nature, including within their own physiology. In Consciousness-Based Education institutions such as Maharishi University of Management, Ms Purcell writes, 'students learn the universal principles of intelligence that are prevalent in every field of study and discover that all knowledge emerges from the unified field of consciousness' which they experience directly through the practice of Transcendental Meditation. 'Reconnecting students to their own inner harmony and to the interconnectedness of all fields of knowledge', she says, 'is an essential and timely step to meeting the urgent needs of our precarious times.' (more)

UK's first Maharishi Peace Palace - creating peace for the individual and peace for society
7 November 2016 - News media continue to feature Britain's first Peace Palace, most recently in a video report on ITV News. The building, inaugurated last month in Rendlesham, Suffolk, will offer programmes and courses founded by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. The Peace Palace and its surrounding residential development were designed in accord with ancient principles of Maharishi Vedic Architecture to promote peace and happiness for those who visit the building and in the environment. Richard Johnson, national director of the Transcendental Meditation programme in the UK, points out that Maharishi's central objective was to promote peace for the individual and the society. Mr Johnson says, 'We want to create peace on the level of consciousness on a deeper level so that it creates bliss in society and internationally', noting scientific research demonstrating this effect when sufficient people practise Transcendental Meditation. (more)


Flops
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UK budget sees economy wilting under Brexit pressure
23 November 2017 - Britain's Treasury chief (Philip Hammond) has outlined cautious spending plans to a nation bracing for the shock of leaving the European Union, amid a stream of worsening of economic forecasts that hampered room for giveaways. Philip Hammond revealed the deteriorating outlook in his annual budget speech to Parliament on Wednesday (22 November), with slowing growth and a stubborn deficit . . . Hammond, who has been nicknamed 'Eeyore' because of his cautious approach, had been under pressure to appear upbeat about the economy's prospects after Brexit. And though Hammond did his best to put a happy stamp on things ... the part of his speech he himself described as 'economicky' revealed the painful truth. The economy is slowing. (more)

Sharp rise seen in self-harm among young teen girls in UK
2 November 2017 - Reports of self-harm jumped nearly 70 percent among younger teen girls in the UK between 2011 and 2014, suggesting an urgent need for interventions targeted to this group, researchers say. Self-harm, such as self-poisoning or self-injury, is the strongest risk factor for subsequent suicide, and suicide is the second most common cause of death before age 25 worldwide, the study team notes in the journal The BMJ. (more)

Scared, hungry, unkempt: how a slave looks in modern Britain
27 September 2017 - People who look unkempt, scared, or work without proper clothing might be the victim of slavery, Britain's anti-slavery body said on Wednesday. Slavery predominantly affects immigrants and vulnerable people, often working at car washes, nail salons, and farms, said the Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority (GLAA), as it launched a campaign to help the public identify trafficking. At least 13,000 people are estimated to be victims of modern slavery in Britain, but police say that figure is just the tip of an iceberg, with numbers rising countrywide. In August, police said slavery was more prevalent than previously thought, with gangs capitalising on a crime estimated to generate profits of $150 billion a year globally. (more)

Britain: Portland prisoners 'developing drug problem in jail'
20 September 2017 - Prisoners have developed drug problems behind bars prompting a rise in violence at a jail, a report says. One in five inmates have a drug habit they did not have before their jail term began at HMP/YOI Portland, HM Inspectorate of Prisons (HMIP) found. It said violence was high against staff as well as inmates at the Dorset jail. (more)

One in four UK teenage girls 'depressed'
20 September 2017 - A quarter of girls and nearly one in 10 boys show signs of depression at the age of 14, say UK researchers. The findings come from more than 10,000 young people who shared their worries and emotions. Lead investigator Dr Praveetha Patalay, from Liverpool University, said teenagers, and particularly girls, were facing more mental health difficulties than previous generations. Half of all cases of adult mental illness start by the age of 14 . . . (more)

Rare fungus found in 200 patients in 55 UK hospitals
15 August 2017 - A rare fungus that can cause drug-resistant infections has been found in around 200 patients in more than 55 hospitals across Britain, health officials said on Tuesday, 15 August. The fungus, also known as C. auris and first identified in Japan eight years ago, is rare and low-risk, but has a propensity to spread between hospital patients. C. auris has since been linked with bloodstream and wound infections, and with ear infections known as otitis, in at least eight other countries including South Africa, Kuwait, India, and Venezuela. (more)

Short sleep linked to body mass, waist size
3 August 2017 - Getting one extra hour of sleep each night might shave a third of an inch off your waist and a couple of pounds off the number on the bathroom scale, a recent study suggests. Longer sleepers also had slightly higher levels of HDL 'good' cholesterol. (more)

UK: Computing in schools -- alarm bells over England's classes
18 June 2017 - Computing education in England's schools is going through a revolution, but there is evidence that too few pupils want to be part of it. Figures from the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation (Ofqual) show only a modest rise in students taking the new computer science GCSE. Experts are concerned. The British Computer Society warns the number studying for a computing qualification could halve by 2020. The organisation -- which is the professional body for the IT industry -- says that would be a disaster for the economy. The other big concern is that too few girls are taking up the computer science exam . . . (more)

Air pollution as bad for wellbeing as partner's death, say researchers
17 April 2017 - The effect on wellbeing of exposure to nitrogen dioxide, a gas mostly produced in diesel fumes, is comparable to the toll from losing a job, ending a relationship, or the death of a partner, research suggests. Pollution from nitrogen oxides is responsible for tens of thousands of premature deaths across Europe, with the UK suffering a particularly high toll. (more)

UK eats almost four times more packaged food than fresh
7 April 2017 - The UK eats almost four times as much packaged food as it does fresh produce, according to new data, with most of western Europe and north America following a similar pattern. The packaged food revolution -- which includes ready meals and calorific cakes and biscuits - is held at least partly to blame for the rise in obesity in the US and Europe. Fresh food has played a smaller and smaller part in some families' lives as the pace of life has speeded up over recent decades, working hours have increased, and more women have entered the workplace. Set against this is the rise of ever more tasty instant meals. (more)

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