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Positive Trends
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Australian solar power at record high
27 April 2017 - The Australian Photovoltaic Institute, with data from the Clean Energy Regulator, says the country has hit a new solar record, with Queensland leading the charge for energy generation. The figures show there are now 6GW of solar power installed across the country, enough to meet the electricity needs of 1.3 million households. (more)

Baby humpback whales 'whisper' to mums to avoid predators
26 April 2017 - The humpback whale is known for its loud haunting songs, which can be heard 20 miles away. However, new recordings show mothers and calves 'whisper' to each other, seemingly to avoid attracting predators. The quiet grunts and squeaks can be heard only at close range. (more)

Oslo, London, Amsterdam lead push for greener transport: study
26 April 2017 - Oslo, London, and Amsterdam are leading a shift by major cities to eliminate greenhouse gas emissions from transport, helped by new technologies that will help to curb climate change and reduce air pollution, a study showed on Tuesday, 25 April. European cities filled eight of the top 10 spots, along with Tokyo and Seoul, in the ranking of 35 cities by the independent London-based Centre for Economics and Business Research (CEBR), sponsored by smartphone chip maker Qualcomm. (more)

US: Hillbillies who code: the former miners out to put Kentucky on the tech map
21 April 2017 - 'A hillbilly is someone who is hardworking, thoughtful, and loyal,' says Garland Couch, a miner turned coder. His employer's ambition? To turn coal country into 'Silicon Holler.' Rusty Justice...hauled his first truck of coal in eighth grade. Justice and his business partner, Lynn Parish, prayed for a business idea that would not just pay, but pay people what they had been making before in the mines. Their breakthrough came when Justice and Parish visited a workforce retraining expo in 2014 in Lexington, where they learned about coding. Each year, 600,000 US tech jobs go unfilled, jobs that ultimately go overseas but could be on-shored if more Americans had the right skills. Even better, the job paid the same as the mines. Justice had seen first-hand how miners employed logic to solve life or death problems underground. Still, he wondered, could a coalminer really code? He called his computer-savvy friend Justin Hall with that question. 'I don't see why not,' Hall said. 'Great, you're hired,' Justice told him. (more)

US beekeeper: Keeping backyard hives benefits bees, humans
20 April 2017 - Generally, adding honey bees will increase the yield of blueberries by 1,000 pounds of berries per hive per acre. Commercially managed honey bee colonies -- which make up more than three quarters of the 2.75 million honey bee colonies in the country -- face many more stresses than we backyard beekeepers do. ... During the past four years, I have been giving many beekeeping classes at my Hampden honeybee farm and in adult education program. In fact, last month I taught my 1,000th student. ... It is very gratifying to know that while not everyone can be beekeepers to help the honeybees, there are those prepared to help with their generosity and inspiration. (more)

Bluebell flowers decorate Belgian forest floor
19 April 2017 - Each spring, the ground of the forest Hallerbos trades in its brown and green hues for vibrant blue, when a burst of bluebell flowers bloom. The protected forest, located south of Brussels near the town of Halle, draws locals and tourists to witness a landscape that looks plucked from a fairy tale. (more)

Physicists observe 'negative mass'
19 April 2017 - Physicists have created a fluid with 'negative mass', which accelerates towards you when pushed. ... in theory, matter can have negative mass in the same sense that an electric charge can be positive or negative. Prof Peter Engels, from Washington State University (WSU), and colleagues cooled rubidium atoms to just above the temperature of absolute zero (close to -273C), creating what's known as a Bose-Einstein condensate. In this state, particles move extremely slowly, and following behaviour predicted by quantum mechanics, acting like waves. They also synchronise and move together in what's known as a superfluid, which flows without losing energy. ...This heightened control also gives researchers a tool for exploring the possible relationships between negative mass and phenomena observed in the cosmos, such as neutron stars, black holes, and dark energy. (more)

US: California utility launches first hybrid power systems
17 April 2017 - A California utility has launched unique systems combining a hybrid battery and gas turbine to produce and store electricity for use during hot summer months and other times when power demand soars. The new Hybrid Electric Gas Turbines are the first of their kind in the world, officials with Southern California Edison and manufacturer General Electric said during an event Monday near Los Angeles. The new systems will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution by 60 percent and save millions of gallons of cooling water annually, Edison said. (more)

A dark matter 'bridge' holding galaxies together has been captured for the first time
13 April 2017 - The first image of a dark matter 'bridge', believed to form the links between galaxies, has been captured by astrophysicists in Canada. Researchers at the University of Waterloo used a technique known as weak gravitational lensing to create a composite image of the bridge. Gravitational lensing is an effect that causes the images of distant galaxies to warp slightly under the influence of an unseen mass, such as a planet, a black hole, or in this case, dark matter. Their composite image was made up of a combination of combined lensing images taken of more than 23,000 galaxy pairs, spotted 4.5 billion light-years away. This effect was measured from a multi-year sky survey at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. (more)

These are the first images of the web of dark matter that holds galaxies together
13 April 2017 - Picture the Universe, and you might imagine a dark emptiness speckled with maybe trillions of galaxies, each containing many billions of stars. The truth is a little weirder, with apparently separate galaxies connected into vast intergalactic webs by invisible filaments of dark matter. If you find it hard to imagine, at least now we can actually see some of those threads thanks to some clever use of gravitational lensing. A team of astronomers at the University of Waterloo in Canada used the space-bending effects of dark-matter to see the unseeable, combining catalogues of galaxy groups that act as lenses with catalogues of data on the light-sources behind them to create a visual of their 'dark' features. (more)


Success of Maharishi's Programmes
10 Short Summaries of Top Stories


Vincent Bataoel: 'We infuse the principles of being stress free and relaxed into our company'
7 March 2017 - Vincent Bataoel and his wife Nelina Loiselle have spent the last decade building Above Green, a successful consulting company which helps clients such as Bank of America, San Francisco Airport, and the US military get their buildings LEED Certified - a highly regarded green building certification programme used around the world. As an unfulfilled college student, Vincent's keen interest in quantum physics, neuroscience, and human potential eventually led him to the Maharishi University of Management website. 'Everything on the site was talking about health, human potential, and consciousness. I knew it was the place for me.' Vincent and Nelina continue to practise Transcendental Meditation, which they learned at MUM - a well-proven tool for increasing resilience. 'We meditate every day', says Vincent. 'It's an important part of our personal lifestyle, but also our business lifestyle. We've tried to infuse the principles of being stress free and relaxed into our company.' (more)

Let your love flow - Transcendental Meditation reduces stress, improves relationships
13 January 2017 - Like many women, Janet Hoffman finds relationships a vitally important area of life. 'My heart has to flow to someone. At any given moment - a child, a sister, a parent, the family pet - someone is the object of my adoration,' writes the executive director of the Transcendental Meditation programme for women professionals in the USA. 'Nourishing someone besides myself is a joy, a fulfilment of being.' In the past she sometimes experienced that channel of expression 'just dries up', like a writer with writer's block. But after learning Transcendental Meditation she found that 'stress and fatigue just melt away. . . . my mind becomes more silent and settled, so I can listen better and appreciate others more.' (more)

Measuring the World for Global Reconstruction: New, groundbreaking book about Maharishi Vastu architecture
27 December 2016 - A second new book related to Maharishi Vastu architecture has recently been published. In Measuring the World for Global Reconstruction, Master Surveyor Roger Audet explains how Maharishi Vastu architecture uses the global grid of latitude and longitude as the basis of town and city planning. This grid, known to the ancient Vedic civilization of India, is used in Vastu architecture to create a master grid for the whole world. The book chronicles the evolution of the concepts and techniques of global survey by civilizations throughout the ages, showing how these key historical developments of measuring the world support the techniques and mathematics of right orientation used in Maharishi Vastu architecture for planning auspicious buildings, towns and cities. (more)

India: Alliance of Women Scientists and Scholars holds annual conference in Rishikesh
10 December 2016 - The Alliance of Women Scientists and Scholars for a Better World is holding its annual conference this year in India. The conference began yesterday and continues through 12 December at Mahila Dhyan Vidya Peeth, Tapovan, Rishikesh. The theme of the conference is Meeting Point of all Religions: Atma, the Self, the Source, Course, and Goal of Life. Speakers include eminent leaders representing the fields of physics, medicine, physiology and health, including the perspective of Ayurveda, the traditional Vedic science of health care; education; and music. The conference programme also features senior educators and administrators of institutions offering Maharishi Mahesh Yogi's Vedic Science and Technology of Consciousness. (more)

Watch Live Webcast - National Summit: Exploring the Science of Meditation on Trauma, Stress, and the Brain - Thursday, 8 December
7 December 2016 - Join Candy Crowley, David Lynch, Dr. Norman Rosenthal, and many other thought leaders -- Thursday, 8 December, 1-3 PM (US Eastern Time) -- for a live webcast of the National Summit on Exploring the Science of Meditation on Trauma, Stress, and the Brain. The David Lynch Foundation's Center for Health and Wellness is hosting this summit to further an important dialogue about how the research-based Transcendental Meditation technique has been shown to lessen the effects of trauma and toxic stress. A panel of leading scientists, educators, and other experts will explore how TM can be used to treat the epidemic of PTS in veterans, the effects of trauma on inner-city school kids, and the impact of TM in the field of addiction recovery and substance abuse. (more)

Developing our mind's full potential
30 November 2016 - Janet Hoffmann, executive director of the Transcendental Meditation programme for women professionals in the USA, discusses developing our full mental potential through TM. Summarizing published, peer-reviewed research in this area, Ms Hoffman says, 'The TM technique . . . promotes brain wave coherence (more regions of the brain sync up and work together). Greater coherence leads to calmness, intelligence, focus, better decision making and problem solving . . . . The experience of transcending resets the brain's ground state, restoring neurological balance and clarity of mind.' (more)

Brain imaging parses Transcendental Meditation practice - Psych Central reports
8 November 2016 - New research, published in the journal Brain and Cognition, explains differences and dispels misconceptions regarding Transcendental Meditation and other meditation practices, Psych Central recently reported. The study found that during practice of Transcendental Meditation, activity in the 'default mode network' (a large-scale brain network involving areas in the front and back of the brain) was high, showing that the process did not involve effort or control of the mind. These findings underscoring the effortlessness of TM practice are in contrast with those on other meditation practices, which all show decreased activity in the default mode network - indicating that the mind is being focused, and not allowed to effortlessly transcend. 'It's a critical point,' said lead author Fred Travis, PhD, director of the Center for Brain, Consciousness, and Cognition at Maharishi University of Management. 'Researchers, commentators, and popular media often lump meditation practices together.' (more)

Research validates the defining hallmark of Transcendental Meditation -- effortlessness
4 November 2016 - As the value of meditation becomes widely recognized, researchers are increasingly trying to understand the differences among approaches. A study published 4 November in the journal Brain and Cognition reports subjective experiences and cortical activation patterns that distinguish the Transcendental Meditation technique from other meditation practices. 'Transcendental Meditation uses a mantra, and for this reason some researchers maintain that it involves focused attention and controlling the mind,' said lead author Fred Travis, Director of the Center for Brain, Consciousness and Cognition at Maharishi University of Management. 'Those who practice TM know this is not the case. This study supports their experience that Transcendental Meditation is easy to learn and effortless to practice.' (more)

What is a Vedic observatory?
4 November 2016 - Recently, Maharishi University of Management installed a Maharishi Vedic Observatory on its campus in Fairfield, Iowa, USA, as part of its new campus master plan. But what is a Vedic observatory? In the 1980s when MUM Founder Maharishi Mahesh Yogi was restoring the complete value of Vedic architecture, he supervised a thorough investigation of traditional celestial observation instruments for measuring the path and position of the sun and stars. The study culminated in the creation of the Maharishi Vedic Observatory, a collection of ten intricately crafted 'instruments' built according to the ancient designs. . . . These instruments are designed to give the observer a clear, direct view and personal experience of the order inherent in the dynamic movement of the celestial bodies. Maharishi explained that just looking at these instruments has the effect of resetting the functioning of the observer's physiology so it is more closely aligned with the immense order and intelligence of the cosmos. A Maharishi Vastu home is designed to be as connected to the sun and the cosmos as are the Maharishi Vedic Observatory instruments. (more)

Maharishi University of Management makes sustainability its focus
28 July 2016 - The Excellence In Action page of Global Good News is featuring Maharishi University of Management's 'green' academic programs at their Sustainable Living Center, with a focus in the areas of building and construction. Students gain knowledge of green building methods that supplement healthier and more efficient materials and strategies throughout the construction process. Green building takes into account all impacts of the built environment, including consumption, environmental effects, and overall effects on the occupant and world. MUM's Sustainable Living programs enable individuals to be pioneers in this field, making real and lasting changes to buildings used for life, work, and play. (more)


Flops
10 Short Summaries of Top Stories


Study finds how polluting nanoparticles get into blood and damage hearts
26 April 2017 - Inhaled nanoparticles like those pumped out in vehicle exhausts can work their way through the lungs and into the bloodstream where they can raise the risk of heart attack and stroke, scientists said on Wednesday [26 April]. In experiments using harmless ultra-fine particles of gold, the scientists were able for the first time to track how such nanoparticles are breathed in, pass through the lungs and then gain access to the blood. (more)

Atlantic salmon farms shift to open seas, trying to shake off lice
20 April 2017 - Atlantic salmon farming companies are designing huge pens to raise fish in the open seas in a radical shift from calm coastal waters where marine lice have slowed growth of the billion-dollar industry. The drive for new designs by Norway, producer of 54 percent of all farmed Atlantic salmon in 2016, will have to cope with ocean storms that can rip cages and free thousands of fish. Escapees disrupt natural stocks by breeding with wild cousins. (more)

Arctic seas called 'dead end' for plastic floating from U.S., Europe
19 April 2017 - The Arctic is a dead end for floating plastic waste dumped in the Atlantic Ocean off Europe and the United States and swept north by ocean currents to a polar graveyard, scientists said on Wednesday. of plastic found east of Greenland and in the Barents Sea off Norway and Russia were far higher than expected for the sparsely populated regions, according to the report showing how man-made pollution extends even to remote parts of the globe. (more)

Leaning forward during phone use may cause 'text neck'
14 April 2017 - Spine surgeons are noticing an increase in patients with neck and upper back pain, likely related to poor posture during prolonged smartphone use, according to a recent report. 'In an X-ray, the neck typically curves backward, and what we're seeing is that the curve is being reversed as people look down at their phones for hours each day,' said study coauthor Dr. Todd Lanman, a spinal neurosurgeon at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. (more)

Smithfield makes move on market for pig-human transplants
12 April 2017 - Smithfield Foods, the world's largest pork producer, has established a separate bioscience unit to expand its role in supplying pig parts for medical uses, with the ultimate goal of selling pig organs for transplantation into humans. Smithfield, the $14 billion subsidiary of China's WH Group ... already harvests materials for medical use from the 16 million hogs it slaughters each year. The company owns more than 51 percent of its farms and hopes to sell directly to researchers and health-care companies, which now typically buy from third parties. (more)

Hawaiian health officials issue warning over an outbreak of brain-invading parasites
10 April 2017 - A sharp rise in infections stemming from a parasitic worm that invades the human brain has health officials in the Hawaiian island of Maui worried. Six cases of rat lungworm disease have so far been confirmed in Maui in the last three months, with more episodes currently being investigated. Given the island had only experienced two documented cases of rat lungworm in the decade before this outbreak, the sudden increase is causing concern. According to officials, the parasite has been identified in slugs and snails on Maui, Oahu, Kauai, and the Big Island... But climate change could also be playing a role in helping the parasite survive in new ecosystems. (more)

How artificial life spawned a billion-dollar industry
6 April 2017 - Scientists are getting closer to building life from scratch and technology pioneers are taking notice, with record sums moving into a field that could deliver novel drugs, materials, chemicals, and even perfumes. Despite ethical and safety concerns, investors are attracted by synthetic biology's wide market potential and the plummeting cost of DNA synthesis, which is industrializing the writing of the genetic code that determines how organisms function. ... Work is also advancing by leaps and bounds in the complementary area of gene editing now being embraced by many of the world's top drugmakers. (more)

Carbon fibre: the wonder material with a dirty secret
22 March 2017 - Researchers are scrambling for ways to get the strong, light material out of landfill and make it ready for recycling and reuse. Carbon fibre is increasingly celebrated as a wonder material for the clean economy. Its unique combination of high strength and low weight has helped drive the wind power revolution and make planes more fuel efficient. Auto makers are also waking up to the material's potential to make lighter and more efficient vehicles. But carbon fibre has a dirty secret: the hi-tech material is wasteful to produce and difficult to recycle. To become the strong, light composite material industries love, carbon fibre is combined with a plastic polymer resin. (more)

Great Barrier Reef will never be as pristine as it once was: scientists
16 March 2017 - Parts of Australia's Great Barrier Reef will never recover from the impact of unseasonably warm waters, scientists said on Thursday [16 March], as more of the World Heritage Site comes under renewed threat from a recent spike in sea temperatures. Warm seas around the reef killed some two-thirds of a 700 kilometer (496.4 miles) stretch of coral last year after warm water caused the coral to expel living algae, triggering it to calcify and turn white, a process known as bleaching. That was the worst die-off of coral ever recorded at the reef. (more)

Growing algae bloom in Arabian Sea tied to climate change
15 March 2017 - The Gulf of Oman turns green twice a year, when an algae bloom the size of Mexico spreads across the Arabian Sea all the way to India. Scientists who study the algae say the microscopic organisms are thriving in new conditions brought about by climate change, and displacing the zooplankton that underpin the local food chain, threatening the entire marine ecosystem. The swarms of microscopic creatures beneath the surface of the Gulf of Oman were all but invisible 30 years ago -- now they form giant, murky shapes that can be seen from satellites. Across the planet, blooms have wrecked local ecosystems. Algae can paralyze fish, clog their gills, and absorb enough oxygen to suffocate them. Whales, turtles, dolphins, and manatees have died, poisoned by algal toxins, in the Atlantic and Pacific. These toxins have infiltrated whole marine food chains and have, in rare cases, killed people, according to the U.N. science agency. Scientists based at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University trace Oman's blooms to melting ice in the Himalayas. (more)


Global Good News features science news indicative of a growing understanding Natural Law

Global Good News features science news indicative of a growing understanding Natural Law, and the application of that knowledge for life-enhancing benefits.

Modern sciences examine the branches of Natural Law, expressed as the disciplines of physics, chemistry, mathematics, biology, and physiology. The fulfilment of modern science is the discovery of the Unified Field of All the Laws of Nature, the unified basis of all streams of knowledge, and the unification of the fundamental force fields of Nature known to science - the electromagnetic, weak, strong, and gravitational fields.

The Unified Field of Natural Law is enlivened in individual awareness through the Transcendental Meditation Technique and the Transcendental Meditation Sidhi Programme, including Yogic Flying. These are the technologies of Maharishi Vedic Science that make available to us the total potential of Natural Law and the total potential of human life.

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